strained neck

Repetitive Strain Injuries Can Result from Work or Play

Most repetitive strain injuries (RSIs) are not serious and can be resolved with the help of the trained physiatrists of Long Island Spine Rehabilitation Medicine. Our physiatrists specialize in pain management and restoration of function through nonsurgical means, so, whether or not you know the cause of your discomfort, our medical team will help you…

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gymnastics

Gymnastic Injuries: Olympian and Otherwise

Simone Biles recently brought international attention to the physical and psychological dangers of gymnastics, but those involved in the sport have always known that injury and extreme stress, as well as grace and beauty, are inherent in the activity.  At Long Island Spine Rehabilitation Medicine, our doctors regularly treat patients who have suffered painful, debilitating…

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doctor checking shoulder pain

Thoracic Outlet Syndrome

If you have been experiencing pain in your neck and shoulders and numbness or weakness in your hands or fingers, you may be suffering from thoracic outlet syndrome. Thoracic outlet syndrome is an uncommon disorder that involves compression of nerves and/or blood vessels and/or in the space between your first rib and your collarbone, an…

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friends in the pool

Swimming Injuries and How to Treat Them

When you go for a refreshing dip, the last thing you want to come out with is pain. Unfortunately, this is not a rare occurrence, especially for those who don’t just cool off by dunking but actively swim laps. Whether you were aware of your injury before you dried off or only noticed it later,…

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muscle fibers

“Fast-Twitch” and “Slow-Twitch” Muscle Fibers?

Most of us are not aware that we have two types of muscle fibers helping us move on a daily basis: “fast-twitch” and “slow-twitch.” Fast-twitch muscle fibers are primarily used only when the body has to make sudden, powerful movements, whereas slow-twitch muscle fibers are used to expend energy slowly and relatively evenly to make…

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injured construction worker

Construction Injuries Don’t Have to Be Catastrophic to Hurt

Any construction job, however small, may cause musculoskeletal injuries that are painful and disabling, injuries that Long Island residents often bring to one of the well-known offices of Long Island Rehabilitation Medicine. Our physiatrists are exceptionally well-trained to diagnose and treat injuries of muscles and joints, including the facet joints of the back.  Now that…

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woman swimming in pool

Swimming Injuries that Affect Bones, Muscles, and Joints

Now that it’s summer again, and pandemic restrictions have greatly diminished, many of us are gleefully getting back into the water. Although swimming is often thought of as a relaxing activity, swimmers get their share of muscular and joint injuries. At Long Island Spine Rehabilitation Medicine, we see patients throughout the year who have suffered…

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woman jumping over hurdles

When Jumping Is Not a Joy

Most of us enjoyed jumping as children, whether in jump rope, hopscotch, on a trampoline, to reach for low-hanging fruit, or to splash in puddles. Nonetheless, both children and adults can suffer painful injuries as a result of jumps that end badly. Let’s take a look at sports that involve jumping and the injuries they…

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Helping Bone Fractures Heal

If you’ve broken a bone, you know the severe pain of the incident itself, and the ongoing discomfort of the healing process. Though some complex or dislocated bone fractures require surgery, in most cases, these injuries heal well once the broken bone is cast or otherwise immobilized. Nonetheless, since bones take much longer to knit…

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